Mono: Symptoms and Prevention
By Kim & Calvert Pediatrics
September 06, 2017
Category: Illness and Injury
Tags: Mono  

Understanding Mono: The “Kissing Disease”Mono

Often called the kissing disease, mononucleosis (mono) is a caused by a virus that is transmitted through saliva. You can get this infection through kissing, but you can also be exposed through a cough or sneeze, or even by sharing a glass or food utensils with someone who has mono. However, mono is not as contagious as some infections, such as the common cold.

As an adolescent or young adult, your child is most likely to get mono with all the signs and symptoms.  If your child has mono, it is important to be careful of certain complications such as an enlarged spleen. Your pediatrician urges you to allow your child proper rest and adequate fluids for a full recovery.  

Some of the signs and symptoms of mononucleosis may include:

  • Fatigue
  • General feeling of being unwell
  • Sore throat that doesn’t get better with antibiotic use
  • Fever
  • Swollen lymph nodes in neck and armpits
  • Swollen tonsils
  • Headache
  • Skin rash
  • Soft, swollen spleen

If your child is experience any of these symptoms, it is important to visit your pediatrician.

Since mononucleosis is spread through saliva, if your child is infected your pediatrician urges you to take extra precautions. To help prevent the spread of the virus, it is important to not kiss your child and not to share food, dishes, glasses and utensils until several days after his or her fever has subsided and even longer, if possible.

Contact your pediatrician for more information on mono and how you can help your child make a full recovery.

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